SB 3.3.15

mitho yadaiṣāṁ bhavitā vivādo
 madhv-āmadātāmra-vilocanānām
naiṣāṁ vadhopāya iyān ato ’nyo
 mayy udyate ’ntardadhate svayaṁ sma
Word for word: 
mithaḥ — one another; yadā — when; eṣām — of them; bhavitā — will take place; vivādaḥ — quarrel; madhu-āmada — intoxication by drinking; ātāmra-vilocanānām — of their eyes being copper-red; na — not; eṣām — of them; vadha-upāyaḥ — means of disappearance; iyān — like this; ataḥ — besides this; anyaḥ — alternative; mayi — on My; udyate — disappearance; antaḥ-dadhate — will disappear; svayam — themselves; sma — certainly.
Translation: 
When they quarrel among themselves, influenced by intoxication, with their eyes red like copper because of drinking [madhu], then only will they disappear; otherwise, it will not be possible. On My disappearance, this incident will take place.
Purport: 

The Lord and His associates appear and disappear by the will of the Lord. They are not subjected to the laws of material nature. No one was able to kill the family of the Lord, nor was there any possibility of their natural death by the laws of nature. The only means, therefore, for their disappearance was the make-show of a fight amongst themselves, as if brawling in intoxication due to drinking. That so-called fighting would also take place by the will of the Lord; otherwise there would be no cause for their fighting. Just as Arjuna was made to be illusioned by family affection and thus the Bhagavad-gītā was spoken, so the Yadu dynasty was made to be intoxicated by the will of the Lord, and nothing more. The devotees and associates of the Lord are completely surrendered souls. Thus they are transcendental instruments in the hands of the Lord and can be used in any way the Lord desires. The pure devotees also enjoy such pastimes of the Lord because they want to see Him happy. Devotees of the Lord never assert independent individuality; on the contrary, they utilize their individuality in pursuit of the desires of the Lord, and this cooperation of the devotees with the Lord makes a perfect scene of the Lord’s pastimes.